Holly Springs NC


Holly Springs is a town in Wake County, North Carolina, United States. As of the 2010 census, the town population was 24,661, over 2 and a half times its population in 2000.

Based on the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 15.1 square miles, of which 15.0 square miles is land and 0.12 square miles, or 0.78%, is water.

Bordering towns include Apex to the north and Fuquay-Varina to the south.

As of the census of 2010, there was 24,661 people, 8,147 households, and 6,706 families living in the town. In the 2000 census, there initially were only 9,192 people, 3,316 households, and 2,609 families living in the town, demonstrating a large rate of growth during the past decade.

It wasn’t until the town built its first sewage plant in 1987 that any real growth happened. It was 1992 before Holly Springs, in line for the spillover from increased populations in Cary and Apex, suddenly exploded. Population expanded from 900 in 1992 to an estimated 6000 in 1998 to nearly 25,000 in 2010.

Holly Springs Community Library, part of the Wake County Public Library system, and a cultural arts facility opened in early December 2006.

On July 18, 2006, it was reported that the pharmaceutical company Novartis would be constructing a manufacturing facility in Holly Springs and employing approximately 350 to make flu vaccines using new technologies. The factory was built on 167 acres in Holly Springs Business Park off N.C. 55 Bypass. Development was finished in late 2008. Novartis’s investment is at least $267 million USD and eventually could reach $600 million USD.

Bristol-Myers Squibb indicated interest in county-owned land along N.C. 55 Bypass at the future interchange of Interstate 540. The County originally conveyed a desire to allow the proposed landfill site to be used for economic development to be sold to the company, however county leaders refused to transfer a solid waste transfer station which would be at the entrance. When the company didn’t locate on the site, the Wake County Board of Commissioners voted five to two to proceed with plans to develop a landfill there.

For years, town leaders have become ever more certain that Holly Springs is positioned to see high growth, propelled by the economic engine of Research Triangle Park (RTP). At a distance of 18 miles, Holly Springs is close to RTP.

In 2007, it was ranked the 22nd best small town to live in, according to a CNNMoney.com evaluation.

The Harrington-Dewar House, Holly Springs Masonic Lodge, and Leslie-Alford-Mims House are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Holly Springs is a rapidly growing town with much to offer. Well worth a visit, the locals will greet you with arms open wide and smiles on their faces.

 

 



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